Math Unit 1-2

How to help your child with math homework

We do not send home many math worksheets but ask parents to read the above documents which will help you find ways to integrate math authentically into your daily routine.
Ask questions to extend your child’s thinking. Here are some questions you might try. Notice that they require more of a response than just “yes” or “no.”
◆ What do you need to find out?
◆ What are you going to do first?
◆ How you are solving this problem?
◆ How did you get this answer?
◆ Why does your answer make sense?
◆ Can you explain that in a different way?
• Establish a quiet place to work (whether at home, in an afterschool program, or some other place) and a system for bringing homework back and forth to school.
• Certain materials, such as Primary Number Cards and game directions, will be used again and again throughout the year. Because they will be sent home only once, please help your child find a safe place to store their math materials—maybe in a math folder, an envelope, or a shoe box—so that he or she can easily locate and use them when needed. If your child regularly does homework in more than one place, we can talk about how to obtain the necessary materials for each place.-
• Children often use real objects to solve math problems. Please provide a collection (20–30) of small objects such as beans, buttons, or pennies for students to use at home. These can be stored in plastic bags or small containers and kept with other math materials.